MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers have devised a new way to create flexible polymer gels using caffeine as a catalyst.
Advanced Materials

Polymer synthesis gets a jolt of caffeine

09.07.2018 tribonet 76 Views

Using the stimulant as a catalyst, researchers create new gels for drug delivery. Caffeine is well-known for its ability to help people stay alert, but a team of researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s […]

Researchers at MIT have found a way to make graphene with fewer wrinkles, and to iron out the wrinkles that do appear. They found each wafer exhibited uniform performance, meaning that electrons flowed freely across each wafer, at similar speeds, even across previously wrinkled regions.
Advanced Materials

Researchers “iron out” graphene’s wrinkles

06.07.2018 tribonet 55 Views

New technique produces highly conductive graphene wafers. From an electron’s point of view, graphene must be a hair-raising thrill ride. For years, scientists have observed that electrons can blitz through graphene at velocities approaching the […]

Researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive robotic device that can find even tiny leaks in pipes with pinpoint precision, no matter what the pipes are made of.
General Topics

Finding leaks while they’re easy to fix

27.06.2018 tribonet 253 Views

Robot can inspect water or gas pipes from the inside to find leaks long before they become catastrophic. Access to clean, safe water is one of the world’s pressing needs, yet today’s water distribution systems […]

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General Topics

Explained: How does a soccer ball swerve?

20.06.2018 tribonet 163 Views

The smoothness of a ball’s surface — in addition to playing technique — is a critical factor. It happens every four years: The World Cup begins and some of the world’s most skilled players carefully […]

This scanning electron microscope image shows ultrafine diamond needles (cone shapes rising from bottom) being pushed on by a diamond tip (dark shape at top). These images reveal that the diamond needles can bend as much as 9 percent and still return to their original shape.
Advanced Materials

How to bend and stretch a diamond

18.05.2018 tribonet 116 Views

The brittle material can turn flexible when made into ultrafine needles, researchers find. Diamond is well-known as the strongest of all natural materials, and with that strength comes another tightly linked property: brittleness. But now, […]